Home » Review of Electrocution Deaths in Iraq: Part I - Electrocution of Staff Sergeant Ryan D. Maseth, U.S. Army by U.S. Department of Defense
Review of Electrocution Deaths in Iraq: Part I - Electrocution of Staff Sergeant Ryan D. Maseth, U.S. Army U.S. Department of Defense

Review of Electrocution Deaths in Iraq: Part I - Electrocution of Staff Sergeant Ryan D. Maseth, U.S. Army

U.S. Department of Defense

Published January 31st 2013
ISBN : 9781482331981
Paperback
80 pages
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 About the Book 

We initiated this project in response to a February 26, 2008, request from the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, which was based on an inquiry from Representative Jason Altmire to the Secretary of Defense concerningMoreWe initiated this project in response to a February 26, 2008, request from the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, which was based on an inquiry from Representative Jason Altmire to the Secretary of Defense concerning the death of SSG Ryan D. Maseth, U.S. Army, in Iraq. SSG Maseth was electrocuted on January 2, 2008, while showering in his quarters at the Radwaniyah Palace Complex (RPC) in Baghdad. In his letter to the Secretary of Defense dated February 19, 2008, Representative Altmire stated that Defense contracting officials were aware of electrical hazards posed by the shower facility used by SSG Maseth, but failed to direct the facility maintenance contractor to correct them. Accordingly, this office was asked to investigate contracting matters related to the cause of this incident (Appendix A). Based on that request and our initial review of the matter, we sought to review the relevant management, contracting, and maintenance actions prior and subsequent to the electrocution of SSG Maseth. Specifically, we reviewed: command and Government contracting management decisions concerning facility maintenance preceding the incident- procedures for facility support to the RPC- and criteria for and execution of facility inspections and maintenance. Based on our preliminary work and congressional interest, we expanded the scope of our review to include an examination of 17 other electrocutions in Iraq involving U.S. military or contractor personnel associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom since the start of operations in March 2003 (Appendix B).